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the synergy that is gained of all the services in order for us, nor to meet our nation's needs and the synergy and balance necessary to move forward and it limits the new strategy. one of the issues i have come when people do an evaluation of the army, look at brigade combat team, how many brigade combat team compounded when you for the future. that's important to that's fundamental to what we do. however, people tend to forget many other parts about the army that is so critical to us supporting the joint force. first, 75% of the operational forces special operations forces is army. can't forget about that. we are responsive camera to make sure we stay responsive to civil authorities and for the example we continue to make sure we have the right capability to respond to wildfires, hurricane relief, and as you see what's going on today up in the northeast. we provide a broad range of essential services today to combat and commanders that includes intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance for all the geographic combatant commanders. we provide air and missile defense to all geographical combata
off the magnet. .. who are using undocumented workers. that will cut down the flow by about 90% of the border. that makes it possible to secure the border for those that are trying to come across for nefarious purposes for criminals enterprises. we can stop them at the border. then we say to those that are here in an undocumented status you are on probation paying a fine and this is to me what i find when i talk to people the most emotional issue in all of this is language. i find americans across the generations don't want us to have to sing the national anthem in two languages at the world series. they won the national anthem in english even if they were american. so they have to agree if they want to stay here permanently they have to agree to read, write and speak english. i find that among the undocumented workers they have no problem with this. they want to learn english. they understand that to live the american dream they have to learn to speak english. it's only liberals who inhabit college campuses and education departments who have a problem with english becoming the
with his problems which was great that spin too much time trying to make money. >> a useful friends with him? >> i never said anything about him. >> as we go, you have an unusual hobby. you, something unusual. >> i have a collection of backers. also have a collection of airsickness bags. one thing i do ask people who come to the meeting, very helpful if you are traveling, you have an airsickness bag which the free present government afghanistan air sickness bag, so it is a great collection and somebody mentioned years ago in a profile starting in an e-mail, this is -- and odd quirky thing i did. >> what is the mood at the meeting going to be? >> people are very optimistic. people were disappointed because we didn't have the house senate president and then people thought we were going to get the president in the senate and stock didn't go up. we elected a house stronger than the last one. the president got elected to four years, lost two seat in the senate but would you rather have 60 or 15 or more than 40? more than 40, enough to filibuster, not enough to pass something which is whe
to join us today. susan is the bureau chief of usa today where she writes about the white house and national policy and won a slew of awards for distinguished reporting on the presidency, but brandon smith memorial award for deadline reporting on the presidency and coverage of the presidency and a lot of other awards. use a regular guest hosts of the diane beam show on pbs and cnn and many other broadcast outlets. a native of wichita, kan. she received a bachelor's degree from northwest and journalism from columbia where she was a pulitzer fellow. she will be followed by vicki edwards to is electorate at princeton university's woodrow wilson school of public policy international affairs. .. great pleasure to be here with the four people for whom i have so much admiration and the wife quoted so much time and so many stories. i have i think a little bit of news which is i found out the title of the next book that is coming out between tom so you can figure out the 1992 book by renewing congress. it sounds pretty positive. 2000, the permanent campaign. okay maybe not entirely posit
for us compete, first we had forces in carriage, and we had cars, now we are in a global marketplace. i was just in california last week and we need to compete across the country that involves investment technology and it starts in grades k-12. to talk about jobs for people in their 20s and 30s, that is important. but we will not be competitive in the global marketplace we don't focus on it here at home. >> moderator: charlie summers? summers: our government has not been able to work together because of what everyone said. we are not putting in place specific things like comprehensive tax reform that makes sense. inefficiently accumulates revenue and is evenly distributed. what we need to do is make sure that we have comprehensive tax reform that makes sense and address the misallocation of resources that we see to our government, as for instance in benghazi, when they drew down thousands of marine from iraq. we can have more independence there to make sure that the parties know that there is someone else available to take their place. >> moderator: let's move onto the next question rig
of your affection. [applause] >> thank you. i was interested in architecture. i used to look at the cathedral's because of how beautiful they are and how serene, the but i very quickly became interested in how they were built. when you look at one of those european cathedrals you do think how did people get those enormous homes? beauvis had no power tools, know mathematics for constructing cranes and so on, and so i became interested in how it was done and eventually became interested in the society that produced the great cathedrals and the question that strikes anybody is why are they there so i became fascinated by that and quite early on in my career when i was still struggling to make it as a writer i had a go at writing a novel about building a cathedral. i felt jerry convinced it was a great popular novel to be written in the cathedral in about 1976, i wrote a few chapters on an outline and i sent them to my agent. he didn't like it at all and he was right and he said you are writing a tapestry and what you need is a series of linked melodrama. the truth of the matter
and ranking member mccain for their patience and persistence in allowing us to get to this vote. i think once i discuss the bill for a moment, it might not seem like it required much patience to get here but it did. i appreciate it. the history of this amendment is it began as a bill in the senate. this bill passed out of the health, education, labor and pensions committee unanimously, by unanimous consent. an identical bill passed through the house of representatives under suspension. so in many respects it is noncontroversial. i want to also thank while i'm here chairman harkin and ranking member enzi of the help committee for their help getting it through the help committee unanimously and for clearing it for a vote here today on the floor. the bill has at this point nearly 60 cosponsors. it has 18 republican cosponsors. and i wish to thank them individually and by name. senators blunt, boozman, brown of massachusetts, chambliss, cochran, collins, crapo, grassley, heller, hutchison, isakson, kirk, lugar, moran, murkowski, rubio, snowe, and wicker, in addition to all of my democratic cospon
some cures and some scientific breakthroughs, like jim was talking about, that would move us beyond just saying we're going to have to cut medicare by $10 trillion over the next 50 years. >> i'm going to let jonathan respond and then i will let each panelist say when prediction on what they see ahead. jonathan. >> the question becomes do people want to work together. and politically if we think we can do better by opposing everything, you oppose everything. and politically think you can do better by working out deals the way gingrich and republican-led congress worked out deals with bill clinton. they will work that. as a matter of both sides willing to come to the table and give-and-take. >> so that was a very fast. like a journalist. version of what's going on. stand, predictions? >> i think the surprise -- surprise. maybe what happens with health care. health care reform and implantation of health care reform. because we talked about this as if there isn't other people. there are so many people who are in either in the process of or have to make decisions about going forward on h
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8

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